A character analysis of arthur dimmesdale in the scarlet letter

The Scarlet Letter: Character Analysis of Arthur Dimmesdale

Recognizing that death is imminent, he chooses to purify his soul at the last minute by confessing his sin publicly and revealing the scarlet letter A that has appeared on his chest over his heart. Happy are you, Hester, that wear the scarlet letter openly upon your bosom!

Hester is passionate but also strong—she endures years of shame and scorn. The scaffold is the place that Dimmesdale shows the amount of pain and self-loathing he is truly capable of concealing. Since God created the soul and infused it in the human body, salvation is predestined.

He is a stereotypical Puritan father, a literary version of the stiff, starkly painted portraits of American patriarchs. In the forest scene, Dimmesdale evidently realizes that he is human and should ask forgiveness and do penance openly.

The Scarlet Letter

Unlike Dimmesdale, his junior colleague, Wilson preaches hellfire and damnation and advocates harsh punishment of sinners. He was able to carry the burdens, frustrationand pain throughout his life.

Hester may not recognize it, but Chillingworth does. Seven years prior, Hester stood in this place and took the punishment for both of them while he quietly stood aside and led people to believe that he also condemned her.

Chillingworth is self-absorbed and both physically and psychologically monstrous. Character Analysis… The Scarlet Letter is a story of characters that have to live and deal with the effects of sin in different ways.

His will be done! His body refuses to do what his heart says is right. During those long seven years he made no move to lessen her load or his own. The more he suffers, the better his sermons become.

He even has the nerve to tell Hester that he envies her: Despite his role as governor of a fledgling American society, he very much resembles a traditional English aristocrat. The narrator is a rather high-strung man, whose Puritan ancestry makes him feel guilty about his writing career.

In an attempt to seek salvation, he fasts until he faints and whips himself on the shoulders until he bleeds. We first see Dimmesdale portrayed as a nervous and sensitive individual.

In Chapter 11, "The Interior of a Heart," Dimmesdale struggles with his knowledge of his sin, his inability to disclose it to Puritan society, and his desire for penance.

As demonstrated later, his weakened condition makes it easier for him to associate himself with the Black Man in the forest.

So how did this upstanding pillar of the community end up fathering a love child? Her alienation puts her in the position to make acute observations about her community, particularly about its treatment of women.

The more he whips himself, the more eloquent he is on Sunday and the more his congregation worships his words. Dimmesdale whips himself at night, punishing himself for his sin. If he publicly confesses, he loses his ability to be effective in this regard.

By bringing me hither, to die this death of triumphant ignominy before the people! For example, she quickly discerns the truth about her mother and Dimmesdale. Now Dimmesdale has had all that he can bear and lets out a yell that draws the attention of fellow villagers.

The townspeople say that she barely seems human and spread rumors that her unknown father is actually the Devil. In death, perhaps he will find a gentler judgment that his own or that of his fellow citizens of Boston. Because he is captured by Native Americans, he arrives in Boston belatedly and finds Hester and her illegitimate child being displayed on the scaffold.

He writes because he is interested in American history and because he believes that America needs to better understand its religious and moral heritage. English The Scarlet Letter: Click the character infographic to download.

He deals with his guilt by tormenting himself physically and psychologically, developing a heart condition as a result. Despite this portrayal Dimmesdale was a stronger character than given credit for. Of the four major characters in this novel, which investigates the nature of evil and sin and is a criticism of Puritan rigidity and intolerance, Dimmesdale is the only Puritan.

This also leaves open a question: He curses himself for his silence and cowardice. He continues to lie to himself and his followers by keeping his secret hidden, so his is a concealed sin.

He tells her, "his spirit lacked the strength that could have borne up, as thine has been, beneath a burden like thy scarlet letter" Dimmesdale is the main male character in the world famous novel The Scarlet Letter, which is the masterpiece of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Although Dimmesdale commits adultery, it is not until the final part of the novel that he confesses his crime. Arthur Dimmesdale Character Timeline in The Scarlet Letter The timeline below shows where the character Arthur Dimmesdale appears in The Scarlet Letter.

The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance. Character Analysis of Arthur Dimmesdale in "The Scarlet Letter" The Scarlet Letter is a story of characters that have to live and deal with the effects of sin in different ways.

Of these characters, the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale is the character portrayed as the most weak and unnoble. Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale - Dimmesdale is a young man who achieved fame in England as a theologian and then emigrated to America. In a moment of weakness, he and Hester became lovers.

In a moment of weakness, he and Hester became lovers. Dimmesdale character analysis essays Arthur Dimmesdale in the novel, The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorn was a pastor, respected by all and distrusted by none.

This Reverend guided his congregation along their spiritual walks; their pathways to heaven. However, Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale was.

The Scarlet Letter is a story of characters that have to live and deal with the effects of sin in different ways. Of these characters, the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale is the character portrayed as the most weak and ennoble.

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A character analysis of arthur dimmesdale in the scarlet letter
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