Microbial contamination on toothbrush storage

Thoroughly rinse toothbrushes with tap water after brushing to remove any remaining toothpaste and debris. A systematic review was conducted on adult human subjects through three distinct searches.

View at Google Scholar J. A peer-reviewed literature review was conducted to evaluate the cumulative state of knowledge related to toothbrush contamination and its possible role in disease transmission. If deemed necessary, 0.

Articles published from toon human subjects and using the English language were obtained. In the hospital setting, toothbrushes are commonly used for oral care by nurses. If more than one brush is stored in the same holder or area, keep the brushes separated to prevent cross-contamination.

Importantly, despite multiple studies supporting toothbrush contamination and the likely relationship between contamination and disease transmission, there are no studies that specifically examine toothbrush contamination and the role of environmental factors, toothbrush contamination and vulnerable populations in the hospital setting e.

Toothbrush Contamination: A Review of the Literature

The bristles become frayed and worn with use and cleaning effectiveness will decrease. The review included studies that evaluated toothbrush contamination in healthy and oral-diseased adults, guidelines for toothbrush and oral care in both healthy and medically ill persons, hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients, and interventions for reducing contamination of toothbrushes.

In healthy adults, contamination of toothbrushes occurs early after initial use and increases with repeated use [ 23 ]. Introduction Toothbrushes play an essential role in oral hygiene and are commonly found in both community and hospital settings.

Storage and Environment Toothbrushes can become contaminated through contact with the environment, and bacterial survival is affected by toothbrush storage containers.

Glass and Jensen explored ultraviolet light as a means of decontamination and found this method to be effective at reducing the bacterial load on toothbrushes [ 9 ].

The findings are as follows: Common-sense supports that for patients who are more susceptible to infections, a higher level of vigilance to prevent exposure to disease-causing organisms may offer some benefit.

There are no studies that specifically examine toothbrush contamination and the role of environmental factors, toothbrush contamination, and vulnerable populations in the hospital setting e. View at Google Scholar S. This search strategy was verified by a health sciences librarian.

Surfaces in close contact with the patient such as bed frames, countertops, sinks, bedside tables, linens, and mattresses may act as fomites. Less microbial growth on the solid-head power toothbrush could offer a simple solution to the residual microbial contamination problem cited in previous studies.

Group S was significantly lower than H1 48x and H2 x Fuso: In the hospital setting, toothbrushes are commonly used for oral care by nurses. View at Google Scholar M.

Methods A systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted. The tubes containing the brush heads were allowed to air-dry C for 4 hours prior to processing to simulate regular home use.

The first search search 1 identified articles in the selected databases and complete copies of articles that were considered to have met the inclusion criteria were obtained for further review Table 1. Group S was significantly lower than H2 50x YM: A moist environment such as a closed container is more conducive to the growth of microorganisms than the open air.

Toothbrushes may even have bacteria on them right out of the box 4 since they are not required to be sold in a sterile package.

Perhaps the hollow heads provided more surface area for the microorganisms to form biofilms. Experimental and nonexperimental designs were included in the review. Glass found that increased humidity in the environment increased bacterial survival on toothbrushes [ 12 ].

Microbial levels were higher in the H2 group than in the H1 group in 4 out of 5 comparisons. Verran and Leahy-Gilmartin found that toothbrushes supported many different bacteria and the amount of growth was varied [ 13 ].emphasizes on toothbrushes’ contamination and its microbial risks, which is generally underestimated and overlooked in the field of dentistry.

This study detects the presence of.

Nursing Research and Practice

Key search terms used in the review were toothbrush, tooth brushing, colonization, bacterial contamination, contamination, oral hygiene, oral health, nursing practice, microbial contamination, and adults.

much microbial contamination still exists on the toothbrushes. A lower bacterial load can be obtained from the simple and inexpensive act. A peer-reviewed literature review was conducted to evaluate the cumulative state of knowledge related to toothbrush contamination and its possible role in disease transmission.

colonization, bacterial contamination, contamination, oral hygiene, oral health, nursing practice, microbial contamination, and Toothbrush storage is. The study of microbial contamination on storing a toothbrush in a bathroom with a toilet.

Abstract. Aims: To examine the microbial contamination of storing a toothbrush in the bathroom with a toilet among the Colony Forming Unit (CFU) of microbial groups.

Methods and Results: The results are analyzed by the counting of CFU of agar plates. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to compare the residual microbial contamination of a power toothbrush designed with a solid head with 2 power toothbrushes designed with hollow heads.

Toothbrush care: cleaning, storage and replacement. American Dental Association [Internet].

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Microbial contamination on toothbrush storage
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